Holistic Osteopathy

Holistic Osteopathy

What is holistic osteopathy?

This therapy is a unique holistic (whole body) approach to health care. Osteopaths do not simply concentrate on treating the problem area, but use manual techniques to balance all the systems of the body, to provide overall good health and wellbeing.[1]

Is osteopathic the same as holistic?

DOs are complete physicians who, along with MDs, are licensed to prescribe medication and perform surgery in all 50 states. But DOs bring something extra to the practice of medicine—a holistic approach to patient care. DOs are trained to be doctors first, and specialists second.[2]

What does an osteopath do for your body?

An osteopath aims to restore the normal function and stability of the joints to help the body heal itself. They use their hands to treat your body in a variety of ways, using a mixture of gentle and forceful techniques. Techniques are chosen based on the individual patient and the symptoms they have reported.[3]

What are the 4 principles of osteopathy?

1) The body is a unit. 2) Structure governs function. 3) The body is its own ‘Medicine Chest’. 4) The ‘Rule of the Artery’ is supreme.[4]

Can osteopathy make you worse?

Can osteopathy make my lower back pain / sciatica worse? Put simply, yes osteopathy can make your lower back pain / sciatica worse. But it’s rare. The risks for osteopathy are slightly lower than the risks for chiropractic (which are low anyway).[5]

Can an osteopath damage your back?

When it should not be used. Osteopathic treatment is tailored to the individual patient. It is not recommended where there’s an increased risk of damage to the spine or other bones, ligaments, joints or nerves.[6]

Is an osteopath as good as an MD?

In the United States, doctors are either an MD (allopathic doctor) or DO (osteopathic doctor). For patients, there’s virtually no difference between treatment by a DO vs MD. In other words, you should be equally comfortable if your doctor is an M.D. or a D.O.[7]

What is an example of Osteopathic Medicine?

A Hands-On Approach DOs use osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) to help identify and correct the source of the underlying health concerns. They use this technique to help treat low back pain, as well as a variety of other health problems, including headaches and sinus issues.[8]

Does insurance cover osteopathic manipulation?

Indications of Coverage Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment is covered when medically necessary and performed by a qualified physician, in patients whose history and physical examination indicate the presence of somatic dysfunction of one or more regions.[9]

Why would someone need an osteopath?

Most people who see an osteopath do so for help with conditions that affect the muscles, bones and joints, such as: lower back pain. uncomplicated neck pain (as opposed to neck pain after an injury such as whiplash) shoulder pain and elbow pain (for example, tennis elbow)[10]

Do osteopaths crack bones?

Osteopaths use manipulations every day with various patients, the myth that spinal manipulations crack your bones back in place is only a myth.[11]

Why do I feel sick after osteopathy?

Often, osteopathy treatments end up making an infection worse before it gets better. This is because the treatment stimulates the flow of infected fluids around the body, which can cause an unpleasant feeling.[12]